Search
Follow me:
Listen on:

WEEKEND BLOG – TAKING PRIDE IN IRISH CULTURE

Photo by Cork Tourism Guide.

THE MARITIME IRELAND RADIO SHOW & PODCAST WEEKEND BLOG February 18/19/20 2022

How committed are we Irish to preserving our maritime culture? I’ve become increasingly concerned that this is not an aspect of Irish life to which sufficient attention is being given. Since I began the new monthly edition of the MARITIME IRELAND RADIO SHOW & PODCAST, it is an issue which has been brought to my attention. So, for the March edition I’m going to focus on the issue, looking at the draft net fishery for salmon. This is not drift-netting and it is rigorously restricted by law. However, it is part of Irish fishing culture but appears to being subject to a State attitude of being eroded. This deserves attention. Traditional fishermen with generations of family association are involved. I’ve been told from various parts of the country that proposals for the preservation of heritage-based fisheries that have been put forward have been repeatedly rejected at Government level. Why?

GOUGANE BARRA AT THE HEAD OF THE RIVER LEE DOWN TO CORK HARBOUR

Seven thousand people from forty-countries are reported to have signed a petition protesting planning permission for a wind farm overlooking the historic spot where the River Lee begins its course to the sea at Cork Harbour. The petition describes Bord Pleanala’s approval of the wind farm, with 178-metre high turbines, as an “act of national self-harm” against “a special place in the hearts of Irish people and many others around the world.”

Cork County Council, which originally refused planning permission has agreed in cross-party political support to tell Environment Minister Eamon Ryan of their “frustration that a highly intrusive, visually domineering form of development that debases the integrity and the landscape character” of Gougane Barra is being permitted. It is the West Cork location where the Patron Saint of Cork lived as a hermit and gathered disciples, according to history, “before he moved to Cork to found a monastery at the mouth of the Lee which became a centre of learning.” The Council refused permission to Wingleaf Ltd. to build a seven-turbine windfarm at Curraglass/Derreendone.

An Bord Pleanala was told by its own Inspector “in the strongest possible terms” that the development should not be allowed. Rejecting that, the board said the wind farm would “make a positive contribution to the implementation of Ireland’s national strategic policy on renewable energy and its move to a low energy carbon future”.

In the Dáil Cork T.D. Aindrias Moynihan said: “You cannot make another Gougane Barra, but you can find other locations for a wind farm.”

Now there is a thought about what I have raised in this weekend’s blog – How committed are we Irish to preserving our maritime culture?

Join the discussion

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Further reading

Newsletter